How to Become a Freelancer

Had all the corporate life you can stand? Freelancing is a very real option. If striking out on your own sounds scary, Forbes offers some advice for becoming self-employed.

If you're ready to take the plunge—or have already taken it but are having trouble staying afloat—we assembled some essential survival tips. ... Joy D. Cho didn't fancy herself a born entrepreneur. But after four years designing graphics and home accessories in Manhattan, the Syracuse University grad hung out a shingle as a freelance branding and packaging designer for the fashion and food industries. ... Cho's message to fellow freelancers: Don't undervalue your services. "I'm realizing now not to say yes to everything," she says. "In the beginning I said 'Yes' to jobs that did not excite or fit me."

Why the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner won’t feature a comedian in 2019

It's the first time the association hasn't hired a comedian in 16 years.

(Photo by Anna Webber/Getty Images for Vulture Festival)
Culture & Religion
  • The 2018 WHCA ended in controversy after comedian Michelle Wolf made jokes some considered to be offensive.
  • The WHCA apologized for Wolf's jokes, though some journalists and many comedians backed the comedian and decried arguments in favor of limiting the types of speech permitted at the event.
  • Ron Chernow, who penned a bestselling biography of Alexander Hamilton, will speak at next year's dinner.
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How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
Strange Maps
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
  • Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America
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A new study says alcohol changes how the brain creates memories

A study on flies may hold the key to future addiction treatments.

Scott Barbour/Getty Images
Mind & Brain
  • A new study suggests that drinking alcohol can affect how memories are stored away as good or bad.
  • This may have drastic implications for how addiction is caused and how people recall intoxication.
  • The findings may one day lead to a new form of treatment for those suffering from addiction.
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