How Exercise Builds Brain Power and Prevents Disease

It may be that by increasing the already substantial blood-flow to your brain, exercise can help build your IQ and work to keep you safe from neurological conditions that result from old age.

It may be that by increasing the already substantial blood-flow to your brain, exercise can help build your IQ and work to keep you safe from neurological conditions that result from old age. Although your brain accounts for only two percent of your body weight, it takes one-fifth of the oxygen you inhale. When exercise increases the blood-flow to the brain, new neurons are created that cannot only boost your current intelligence but also help protect you against the onset of diseases like dementia thanks to what scientists call a "brain reserve."


Studies have also found that exercise can help brains which have already deteriorated as a natural result of the aging process:

"[O]ne German study found that older people who enjoy mild exercise – such as gardening – are half as likely to suffer from cognitive impairment as they age. Another experiment found that pensioners asked to take a leisurely walk a few times a week scored better on attention and memory tests."

In the future, your office might combine physical exercise regimens along with new training sessions in order to get the most out of your mind. But for now, if you're hoping to sharpen your outlook, it may be time to put the book down and go for a jog. 

Photo credit: Shutterstock

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