Here's a Helpful Infographic on the Many Risks of Helicopter Parenting

Did you know 30 percent of job recruiters have had a parent submit a résumé for their child? Or that girls tend to be helicoptered more than boys?

Below you'll find a nifty infographic produced by the folks at Yellowbrick detailing the consequences of everyone's favorite irritating childrearing trend: helicopter parenting. We've written a lot about this topic here at Big Think; our archives are a veritable smorgasbord of pieces detailing its effects and consequences. Our focus isn't merely because we like to helicopter the helicopter parents, but because shifts in how we raise our kids have resulted in a generation of young adults who lack critical thinking, self-reliance, and coping skills. 


And that sucks not just for said young adults, but also for everyone else who has to deal with their problems.

The image below will shed some light on all these elements, as well as offer a more basic crash course for those still unfamiliar with this troubling trend:

For additional information on and analysis of the items above, check out the Yellowbrick blog.

Some tips for overbearing parents on how to wean themselves off their kids, from author, syndicated columnist, and free-range kids advocate Lenore Skenazy.

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