Ford Predicts Self-Driving Cars Will Cut Traffic by 2017

By optimizing technologies currently on the market, cars will soon be unclogging traffic jams more efficiently than humans can. After the jam is cleared, control of the car is returned to the driver. 

Ford Predicts Self-Driving Cars Will Cut Traffic by 2017

What's the Latest Development?


By combining several technologies that exist today, the automobile company says cars will soon help unclog traffic jams more efficiently than human drivers can. The concept, called Traffic Jam Assist, will use adaptive cruise control, lane keep assist, and sensors from active park assist to keep traffic flowing efficiently and safely. In fact, safety is perhaps the biggest benefit to self-driving car systems, which can neither drive aggressively nor be distracted the way human drivers are. Another automatic driving tool, developed by Volvo and called City Safety, stops cars in potential accident situations on urban roads. 

What's the Big Idea?

In addition to clearing the roads of human driving errors, automated navigation systems will reduce gasoline consumption as well as driving times. "If one in four cars has Traffic Jam Assist or similar self-driving technologies, travel times are reduced by 37.5% and delays are reduced by 20%. That’s because adaptive cruise control (ACC) is better at pacing the car ahead without continual brake, speed-up, brake cycles." Google, which has also been active in creating automated vehicles, has secured Nevada state drivers' licences for its fleet of self-driving cars. How comfortable do you feel about handing control of your car to its on-board computer?

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

 

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