For Future Union Survival, Look To The Canadian Label

Unionization rates have been dropping in both countries, but unlike the US, where anti-union employers hold sway, Canada has instituted laws and guidelines designed to protect and preserve the right to unionize.

Article written by guest writer Kecia Lynn


What's the Latest Development?

Dean Baker, co-founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), reports on his organization's recent study comparing unionization trends in the United States and Canada over the past century. Although membership has dropped in both countries over the last 20 years, close to one in three of Canada's workers belong to unions, which far surpasses the US' rate of one in ten. The study suggests that several key institutional factors play a big role in the continued survival of Canada's unions.

What's the Big Idea?

In several provinces, unionization is made easier by the allowance of majority sign-up recognition (in which workers sign cards stating they want to be union members) and first contract arbitration (in which a third party can step in and settle bogged-down contract disputes). Also, the study found no evidence to support one claim commonly made by anti-union supporters: that decertifications would increase as a result of majority sign-up (due to union members feeling pressured to join). In Baker's opinion, "[I]f we chose, we could make US labor law closer to Canada's...People who care about inequality should have this at the top of their agenda."

Photo Credit: spirit of america / Shutterstock.com

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

In a first for humankind, China successfully sprouts a seed on the Moon

China's Chang'e 4 biosphere experiment marks a first for humankind.

Image source: CNSA
Surprising Science
  • China's Chang'e 4 lunar lander touched down on the far side of the moon on January 3.
  • In addition to a lunar rover, the lander carried a biosphere experiment that contains five sets of plants and some insects.
  • The experiment is designed to test how astronauts might someday grow plants in space to sustain long-term settlements.
Keep reading Show less

A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

She met mere mortals with and without the Vatican's approval.

Strange Maps
  • For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.
  • These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.
  • Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too.
Keep reading Show less

Love in a time of migrants: on rethinking arranged marriages

Arranged marriages and Western romantic practices have more in common than we might think.

Culture & Religion

In his book In Praise of Love (2009), the French communist philosopher Alain Badiou attacks the notion of 'risk-free love', which he sees written in the commercial language of dating services that promise their customers 'love, without falling in love'.

Keep reading Show less