Food Stamp Chic

Jennifer Bleyer reports on how the young, trendy and extremely broke are buying fresh organic produce using government-subsidized “food stamps.” Got a problem with that?

"In the John Waters-esque sector of northwest Baltimore -- equal parts kitschy, sketchy, artsy and weird -- Gerry Mak and Sarah Magida sauntered through a small ethnic market stocked with Japanese eggplant, mint chutney and fresh turmeric. After gathering ingredients for that evening's dinner, they walked to the cash register and awaited their moments of truth. ‘I have $80 bucks left!’ Magida said. ‘I'm so happy!’ ‘I have $12,’ Mak said with a frown. The two friends weren't tabulating the cash in their wallets but what remained of the monthly allotment on their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program debit cards, the official new term for what are still known colloquially as food stamps. Magida, a 30-year-old art school graduate, had been installing museum exhibits for a living until the recession caused arts funding -- and her usual gigs -- to dry up. She applied for food stamps last summer, and since then she's used her $150 in monthly benefits for things like fresh produce, raw honey and fresh-squeezed juices from markets near her house in the neighborhood of Hampden, and soy meat alternatives and gourmet ice cream from a Whole Foods a few miles away. ‘I'm eating better than I ever have before,’ she told me. ‘Even with food stamps, it's not like I'm living large, but it helps.’"

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