FCC to TV Networks: Put Captions on Your Online Content

In a victory for disability advocates, the FCC has ruled that networks and others must provide closed caption data on online video content that was originally produced for television.

Article written by guest writer Kecia Lynn


What's the Latest Development?

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has ruled that television networks and web video sites have until the end of September to start providing basic closed captions for any video content made available online. However, as a concession to the industry's claims of not having enough time to implement the ruling, the FCC has given them another 16 months to provide customizable caption data that allow users to improve readability on their own TVs.

What's the Big Idea?

The ruling marks a victory for disability advocates, who have sued both CNN and Netflix for not doing more to make their content usable for disabled customers and whose activism spurred the 2010 passage of the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act. Unfortunately, their job isn't finished yet: In addition to the customization delay, there's still the matter of video content that solely exists online, which isn't covered by the act. Fortunately "many sites already offer closed captioning for at least a part of their web video inventory, and that likely won’t change at the end of next month."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Compelling speakers do these 4 things every single time

The ability to speak clearly, succinctly, and powerfully is easier than you think

Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee rally at the Anaheim Convention Center on September 8, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Barbara Davidson/Getty Images)
Personal Growth

The ability to communicate effectively can make or break a person's assessment of your intelligence, competence, and authenticity.

Keep reading Show less

CNN files lawsuit against Trump administration

The lawsuit claims the administration violated the First Amendment when it revoked the press credentials of reporter Jim Acosta.

(Photo by Al Drago - Pool/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • CNN reporter Jim Acosta's press credentials were revoked following a heated exchange with President Donald Trump on November 8.
  • The network filed a lawsuit against the administration on Tuesday, claiming the administration has violated multiple amendments.
  • The White House may only revoke the press credentials of journalists for "compelling reasons," not for reasons involving content.
Keep reading Show less

Why millions of Americans didn’t vote during the midterms

Fall is a bad time to hold elections.

Photo credit: Joshua Lott / Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Usually, only about 40 percent of eligible voters participate in midterm elections.
  • Political philosopher John Stuart Mill believed it would be for the collective good if everybody voted.
  • Because of logistics, we may need to change the time of year we vote.
Keep reading Show less