Explaining the "Impostor Phenomenon"

People who experience the "impostor phenomenon" believe their successes are undeserved—and they live in constant fear of being unmasked despite consistently good performance.

Why is it that some people who consistently receive praise for jobs-well-done do not believe they deserve congratulations? "Some people feel like they have fooled everyone into thinking they are smarter or more competent than they really are, despite consistently performing well and garnering praise. This feeling of being an impostor is related to but not fully explained by depression, social anxiety and low self-esteem. It may be more common in women. To break the cycle of self-doubt and self-sabotage, people must learn how to give themselves credit for their achievements as well as take constructive criticism about their mistakes and failures."

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

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Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

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Reigning in brutality - how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

The history of the Geneva Conventions tells us how the international community draws the line on brutality.

Napoleon III at the Battle of Solferino. Painting by Adolphe Yvon. 1861.
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely.
  • Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more.
  • Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries.
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The most culturally chauvinist people in Europe? Greeks, new research suggests

Meanwhile, Spaniards are the least likely to say their culture is superior to others.

Image: Pew Research Center
Strange Maps
  • Survey by Pew Research Center shows great variation in chauvinism across Europe.
  • Eight most chauvinist countries are in the east, and include Russia.
  • British much more likely than French (and slightly more likely than Germans) to say their culture is "superior" to others.
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Photo credit: Ian Waldie / Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The coalition argues that government agencies might abuse facial recognition technology.
  • Google and Microsoft have expressed concern about the potential problems of facial recognition technology.
  • Meanwhile, Amazon has been actively marketing the technology to law enforcement agencies in the U.S.
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