Dubai to Build World's First Climate-Controlled City

Dubai is set to build the world's largest--and truly first--completely climate-controlled city. The structure will measure 48 million square feet, including 20,000 rooms available for stay.

What's the Latest?


Dubai is set to build the world's largest--and truly first--completely climate-controlled city. The structure will measure 48 million square feet, including 20,000 rooms available for stay divided between an expected 100 hotels and serviced apartment buildings. "Also included: a 3 million sq. ft. wellness zone catering to medical tourists, dedicated to providing wellness and rejuvenation services." For the city's cultural district, architects are planning theaters built around New York's Broadway, Ramblas Street in Barcelona, and London's Oxford Street.

What's the Big Idea?

Planners expect the city to draw 180 million tourists visits each year, including any number of international conferences attracted to the novel surroundings. The wellness zone will "offer a holistic experience to medical tourists and their families, ensuring access to quality healthcare, specialized surgical procedures and cosmetic treatments, wellness facilities, and high-end hospitality options, according to a Dubai Holding statement." The city, which will take ten years to complete once construction begins, will also contain the world's largest shopping mall.

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