Does Gravity Explain Physics' Mysteries?

Several mysteries currently bedevil physicists such as our inability to account for an expanding universe and an apparent exception to the cosmological principle of uniform laws.

What's the Latest Development? 


A new theory about gravity has been put forth that could tie the loose ends of contemporary physics. Edmund Schluessel of Cardiff University says that large waves of gravity which disrupt the space-time grid could still be rippling through the universe billions of years after the big bang set them in motion. Those ripples could be strong but subtle enough to warp our observations of the universe while simultaneously keeping us from detecting the waves directly. If the waves affect the refraction of light, many of our current observations could be thrown into doubt. 

What's the Big Idea?

Schluessel's hope is not to through us into more doubt but to resolve the apparent contradictions of contemporary physics. When physicists observed an expanding universe, for example, they were required to posit dark matter, yet this driving force of the cosmos has yet to be directly observed though it theoretically composes over 70 percent of everything we "know". Recent observations have also suggested that the universe may be expanding faster in some regions than in others contradicting the long-held cosmological principle which states physical laws are constant across the universe. 

Big Think
Sponsored by Lumina Foundation

Upvote/downvote each of the videos below!

As you vote, keep in mind that we are looking for a winner with the most engaging social venture pitch - an idea you would want to invest in.

Keep reading Show less

Scientists figure out how to trap dark matter

A new method promises to capture an elusive dark world particle.

Surprising Science
  • Scientists working on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) devised a method for trapping dark matter particles.
  • Dark matter is estimated to take up 26.8% of all matter in the Universe.
  • The researchers will be able to try their approach in 2021, when the LHC goes back online.
Keep reading Show less

Scientists create a "lifelike" material that has metabolism and can self-reproduce

An innovation may lead to lifelike evolving machines.

Shogo Hamada/Cornell University
Surprising Science
  • Scientists at Cornell University devise a material with 3 key traits of life.
  • The goal for the researchers is not to create life but lifelike machines.
  • The researchers were able to program metabolism into the material's DNA.
Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • As a stand-up comedian, Pete Holmes knows how words can manipulate audiences — for good and bad.
  • Words aren't just words. They stich together our social fabric, helping establish and maintain relationships.
  • Holmes has a clever linguistic exercise meant to bring you closer to the people around you.