Did You Watch KONY 2012 Yesterday?

A small non-profit called Invisible Children has created a huge stir over a highly-produced half-hour video which garnered millions of views in just hours. Did you see it? What do you think? 

What's the Latest Development?


Shortly after a half-hour video about the Ugandan war lord Joseph Kony went viral, garnering millions of views in just hours, the inevitable backlash began. The video was produced by a small non-profit called Invisible Children who wants to raise awareness about the crimes Kony has committed, crimes including abducting children to become child soldiers. His actions have earned him the status of the world's most wanted man before the International Criminal Court. Critics are now taking a closer look at the video and the non-profit itself. 

What's the Big Idea?

One criticism of the video is that it uses social media to advocate for armed conflict. Foreign Policy's Michael Wilkers says it is extremely dangerous to essentially sell a foreign intervention in a reductive and highly-produced video (apparently that sort of thing must be left to more sanctioned media). The biggest criticism of Invisible Children comes from a blog called Visible Children which accuses the non-profit of spending too much money on awareness efforts and not enough on the ground in Uganda. What do you think? Can the video have a multiplier effect on funding given the incredible success it has had? 

Photo credit: wikipedia


Related Articles

How schizophrenia is linked to common personality type

Both schizophrenics and people with a common personality type share similar brain patterns.

(shutterstock)
Mind & Brain
  • A new study shows that people with a common personality type share brain activity with patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.
  • The study gives insight into how the brain activity associated with mental illnesses relates to brain activity in healthy individuals.
  • This finding not only improves our understanding of how the brain works but may one day be applied to treatments.
Keep reading Show less

Human skeletal stem cells isolated in breakthrough discovery

It's a development that could one day lead to much better treatments for osteoporosis, joint damage, and bone fractures.

Image: Nissim Benvenisty
Surprising Science
  • Scientists have isolated skeletal stem cells in adult and fetal bones for the first time.
  • These cells could one day help treat damaged bone and cartilage.
  • The team was able to grow skeletal stem cells from cells found within liposuctioned fat.
Keep reading Show less

How exercise helps your gut bacteria

Gut bacteria play an important role in how you feel and think and how well your body fights off disease. New research shows that exercise can give your gut bacteria a boost.

National Institutes of Health
Surprising Science
  • Two studies from the University of Illinois show that gut bacteria can be changed by exercise alone.
  • Our understanding of how gut bacteria impacts our overall health is an emerging field, and this research sheds light on the many different ways exercise affects your body.
  • Exercising to improve your gut bacteria will prevent diseases and encourage brain health.
Keep reading Show less