Art and Design Can Save Detroit

Young artists are fleeing New York and searching for new, accessible locales to set up shop. Detroit's budding arts scene has welcomed them with open arms.

What's the Latest?


Just the mention of Detroit conjures images of crumbling factories, derelict homes -- a once-grand metropolis abandoned by a nation that leaped ahead without it. Thessaly La Force, in an article at Vogue, details the sorry plight of America's emblematic city of industrial ruin while also pondering what the future may hold:

"The crumbling mansions and empty factories are beautiful to behold but offer little in the way of a future. As David Adjaye remarked at Culture Lab Detroit, 'All architecture is ruins.' But, he added, a city is a 'living thing.'When it comes to Detroit, our responsibility is to think about how to keep it alive."

What's the Big Idea?

The secret to keeping Detroit alive may lie in the city's newest residents. Call it the Arts Invasion. The Motor City has emerged as one of the hottest destinations for young artists fleeing the increasing inaccessibility of New York.

“Detroit is constantly amazing me,” gushes a young artist in the 2012 documentary Detropia.He’s cleaning his kitchen appliances because, as he explains, he’s never owned anything so nice before. “I feel like it’s redefining for me the value of what things are,” he says. “$25,000 for an amazing loft? That just makes it accessible for people like me. I was never able to afford a home as an artist.” He adds: “We can experiment here, because if we fail we haven’t really fallen anywhere.”

La Force points to the influx of artists and recalls the efforts of the city's leadership to invest in upheavals in design. The basic theory: Detroit needs a face lift if it's ever going to move away from its past. The artists and designers moving into the city present an opportunity to get that process started.

Read more at Vogue

Photo credit: Atomazul / Shutterstock.com

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

People who engage in fat-shaming tend to score high in this personality trait

A new study explores how certain personality traits affect individuals' attitudes on obesity in others.

Pixabay
Mind & Brain
  • The study compared personality traits and obesity views among more than 3,000 mothers.
  • The results showed that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are linked to more negative views and behaviors related to obesity.
  • People who scored high in conscientiousness are more likely to experience "fat phobia.
Keep reading Show less

4 anti-scientific beliefs and their damaging consequences

The rise of anti-scientific thinking and conspiracy is a concerning trend.

Moon Landing Apollo
popular
  • Fifty years later after one of the greatest achievements of mankind, there's a growing number of moon landing deniers. They are part of a larger trend of anti-scientific thinking.
  • Climate change, anti-vaccination and other assorted conspiratorial mindsets are a detriment and show a tangible impediment to fostering real progress or societal change.
  • All of these separate anti-scientific beliefs share a troubling root of intellectual dishonesty and ignorance.
Keep reading Show less

Reigning in brutality - how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

The history of the Geneva Conventions tells us how the international community draws the line on brutality.

Napoleon III at the Battle of Solferino. Painting by Adolphe Yvon. 1861.
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely.
  • Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more.
  • Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries.
Keep reading Show less