Apple Working Against the Public Interest, Insists Justice Department

The Justice Department maintains that Apple's agreement with major publishers over how it markets e-books prevents its competitors from setting prices that would benefit consumers. 

What's the Latest Development?


The Justice Department maintains that an agreement brokered by Apple with major publishing companies, including Penguin, Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins, constitutes a disincentive for competition in the e-book market. While the government has tried to settle the case, Apple continues its legal battle, prompting the Justice Department to remark that its objection is "a naked attempt by Apple to have its competitors’ ability to compete on price constrained – to take away the nearly unfettered ability to discount that a retailer who desires to compete would embrace but Apple fears."

What's the Big Idea?

The agreement which Apple struck with major publishers, in response to Amazon's pricing all e-books at $9.99, has become known as the 'agency model.' Under the agreement, publishers were free to set their own prices so long as Apple was given 30% of e-book sales. Apple has received, however, the support of the influential New York Senator Chuck Schumer, who argues that the agency model has "introduced more competition, offered readers other platforms from which to buy books and was, ultimately, in the long-term interest of the publishing industry." If no settlement is reached, a trial is expected next summer. 

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com


Stress is contagious–but resilience can be too

The way that you think about stress can actually transform the effect that it has on you – and others.

Big Think Edge
  • Stress is contagious, and the higher up in an organization you are the more your stress will be noticed and felt by others.
  • Kelly McGonigal teaches "Reset your mindset to reduce stress" for Big Think Edge.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.
Keep reading Show less

Do you have a self-actualized personality? Maslow revisited

Rediscovering the principles of self-actualisation might be just the tonic that the modern world is crying out for.

Personal Growth

Abraham Maslow was the 20th-century American psychologist best-known for explaining motivation through his hierarchy of needs, which he represented in a pyramid. At the base, our physiological needs include food, water, warmth and rest.

Keep reading Show less

Scientists reactivate cells from 28,000-year-old woolly mammoth

"I was so moved when I saw the cells stir," said 90-year-old study co-author Akira Iritani. "I'd been hoping for this for 20 years."

Yamagata et al.
Surprising Science
  • The team managed to stimulate nucleus-like structures to perform some biological processes, but not cell division.
  • Unless better technology and DNA samples emerge in the future, it's unlikely that scientists will be able to clone a woolly mammoth.
  • Still, studying the DNA of woolly mammoths provides valuable insights into the genetic adaptations that allowed them to survive in unique environments.
Keep reading Show less

Believe in soulmates? You're more likely to 'ghost' romantic partners.

Does believing in true love make people act like jerks?

Thought Catalog via Unsplash
Sex & Relationships
  • Ghosting, or cutting off all contact suddenly with a romantic partner, is not nice.
  • Growth-oriented people (who think relationships are made, not born) do not appreciate it.
  • Destiny-oriented people (who believe in soulmates) are more likely to be okay with ghosting.
Keep reading Show less