A Glass That Warns You If Your Drink's Been Spiked

Thanks in part to a successful crowdfunding campaign, backers of the DrinkSavvy line -- glasses, cups, straws and stirrers that react to the presence of common "date-rape" drugs -- will start receiving the product next month.

What's the Latest Development?


Starting next month, bar patrons may begin seeing a special kind of drinkware while out and about: DrinkSavvy is a line of cups, glasses, stirrers and straws that change color or pattern if a drink has been spiked with "date-rape" drugs Rohypnol, GHB, or ketamine. This first release is headed for some of the backers who helped contribute $52,000 to an Indiegogo campaign last December. A larger commercial release is planned for mid-2014, at which time select rape crisis centers will also be able to get the drinkware for free.

What's the Big Idea?

According to a 2007 estimate, approximately 200,000 American women experience drug-related assault each year. After unknowingly consuming a spiked drink himself, and finding current testing kits cumbersome, DrinkSavvy founder Mike Abramson worked with a chemistry professor to create drinkware with built-in testing material. "The neat thing is that the cups and straws look just like any other cup or straw, so you don't really need to do anything...[They] will immediately change color – within three seconds or so – from coming in contact with date-rape drugs." Although most of the first release is going to individuals, Abramson says that bar and restaurant owners have also expressed interest in replacing their existing drinkware with DrinkSavvy products.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at The Guardian

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