Innovative "Salmon Cannon" Helps Transport Migratory Fish Blocked By Dams

Described by some as "the salmon cannon," a suction-based transportation system developed by Whooshh Innovations makes transporting fish incredibly easy.

A company by the very onomatopoeic name of Whoooshh Innovations has created a suction-based fish transportation system some are calling "the salmon cannon." While its capabilities as a long range fish propulsion device are somewhat limited, the suction-based system does allow conservationists and fisheries the ability to easily, cheaply, and painlessly (for all parties involved, fish included) transport our finned friends from one body of water to another. 


Here's a video (no sound so don't rush to turn up your speakers) of the system in action:

The device is cleverly simple and offers benefits to those dealing with fish both live and dead. The Whooshh website details the system's capabilities vis-à-vis speed (40 fish per minute), distance (up to 200 meters), and flexibility (designs can be customized). It also explains how the tubes are cleaned, which I imagine is a necessity knowing how awful those things would probably smell.

Whooshh, which is based in Bellevue, Washington, has already tested the system with the local Yakama Nation Fisheries. If the tests are deemed successful and it's determined there were no detrimental effects to transporting the fish via tube, Whooshh's system could represent a peaceful bridge between the organic processes of nature and the power needs of a tech-based society.

One other note: on top of offering a more cost- and labor-effective method of fish transportation, Whooshh (via io9) has also provided us with the gift of this amazing and tremendous Salmon Cannon GIF:

Glorious.

Learn more about the system at Whooshh's website and check out video of their similar device for fruit handling and transport.

Read more at io9

Photo credit: KPG_Payless / Shutterstock

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