Hooman Majd in the Big Think Studio

Hooman Majd, the Iranian-American journalist who wrote "The Ayatollah Begs to Differ: The Paradox of Modern Iran" will be in the Big Think studio today answering questions about how the new administration is approaching U.S.-Iran relations. 

Majd was born in Tehran in 1957 but lived almost his entire life abroad with his diplomat parents. Majd had a long career in the entertainment business. He worked at Island Records and Polygram Records for many years and was head of film and music at Palm Pictures, where he produced The Cup and James Toback's Black and White.


On more than one occassion, Majd has served as the official translater for Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on the Iranian president's trips abroad. Majd has written for GQ, The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New York Observer, Interview, and Salon, and Interview magazine, where he is a contributing editor. He lives in New York City and travels regularly back to Iran.

Do you have questions for Majd? Send them to sean@bigthink.com.

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