Good and Evil.. connect the dots...

We can connect the dots all the way back to when mankind codified good and evil. No god required.

Humans leave trails, it's called evidence. eg, Something as beautiful as music.. at a basic level we can trace it's development, it's evolution. The most complex 80 piece orchestral composition had it's seeds in the simple modal chants of Gregorian monks.


The development of notation and the codification of difficult concepts are all able to be traced back. The romantic, mystical and poetic dimensions to this art are ways we have of understanding how music makes us feel, tools to unwrap the riddle.

Likewise with philosophy and myth.. good and evil evolved as a concept from human experience. Ancient gods were utilitarian, and the ones that seemed to work best, ie. their followers seemed to prosper, attracted a bigger slice of the believer market. In the swill of ideas in the milennia before Christ, Yahweh beat out other popular gods like Baal and Mithras to gain more followers. Around that time the Iranian prophet Zoaroaster distilled the many gods idea down to two, truth and lie, or good and evil, this eventually syncretised into the Xtian version of understanding it of god and the devil.

The trail is there... follow it. There is no special case for Christ, it's just a prism through which to view the world that was built on existing ideas. The supernatural overlay is a poetic and romantic association attached to the idea, just as it is with music, and that is a human constuct as well.

How to make a black hole

Here's the science of black holes, from supermassive monsters to ones the size of ping-pong balls.

Videos
  • There's more than one way to make a black hole, says NASA's Michelle Thaller. They're not always formed from dead stars. For example, there are teeny tiny black holes all around us, the result of high-energy cosmic rays slamming into our atmosphere with enough force to cram matter together so densely that no light can escape.
  • CERN is trying to create artificial black holes right now, but don't worry, it's not dangerous. Scientists there are attempting to smash two particles together with such intensity that it creates a black hole that would live for just a millionth of a second.
  • Thaller uses a brilliant analogy involving a rubber sheet, a marble, and an elephant to explain why different black holes have varying densities. Watch and learn!
  • Bonus fact: If the Earth became a black hole, it would be crushed to the size of a ping-pong ball.

10 paradoxes that will stretch your mind

From time-traveling billiard balls to information-destroying black holes, the world's got plenty of puzzles that are hard to wrap your head around.

Big Think
Surprising Science
  • While it's one of the best on Earth, the human brain has a lot of trouble accounting for certain problems.
  • We've evolved to think of reality in a very specific way, but there are plenty of paradoxes out there to suggest that reality doesn't work quite the way we think it does.
  • Considering these paradoxes is a great way to come to grips with how incomplete our understanding of the universe really is.
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China’s artificial sun reaches fusion temperature: 100 million degrees

In a breakthrough for nuclear fusion research, scientists at China's Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) reactor have produced temperatures necessary for nuclear fusion on Earth.

Credit: EAST Team
Surprising Science
  • The EAST reactor was able to heat hydrogen to temperatures exceeding 100 million degrees Celsius.
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