Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Women are more productive than men at work these days

It's just one of the workplace gender insights in a new study.

  • Women complete 10 percent more office work than men.
  • Gender divisions persist between women and men at work.
  • New study reveals some habits we need to break.

There are certainly measures by which we've barely made any progress on gender equality in the workplace. There remains a "pink tax" that has women still making 81.8 percent of what mean earn for the same work performed by men. And there's still a shocking underrepresentation of women in executive suites. Hive is a productivity platform that works with an impressive roster of large companies, and they wanted to learn more about if and how gender experiences have changed in today's office spaces. The company was able to anonymously source information from over 3,000 working men and women, and they've just released the results of their analysis in their "State of the Workplace Report" on gender. It contains some interesting insights.

All of the infographics in this article are by Hive.

Who produces more, men or women?

According to Hive, women work 10 percent harder than men in today's offices. This conclusion is the product of two other statistics. First, both men and women actually complete about 66 percent of their assigned work. However, women are assigned 10 percent more work than men these days — that they achieve the same completion rate tells us that they're being more industrious.

Why are women being given more to do? Hive cites research that finds it has to do with the kind of work allotted them, noting that, "women are assigned and spend more time on non-promotable tasks than men [our emphasis]. These non-promotable tasks are any activity that is beneficial to the organization, but does not contribute to career advancement." So basically, things men don't want to do are begin handed to women.

Productivity by gender

Does chatting really get in the way of work?

Research by the University of California suggests that chatting significantly disrupts the workday since it takes, on average, about 25 minutes to get back in the groove after such an interruption. Another study found that chatting leads to a reduction in productivity of about 20 percent.

Overall, women chat 20 percent more than men, but — given that they get 10 percent more done — chatting doesn't seem to be an issue for their productivity. In addition, they only dominate person-to-person chatting.

Group chats — such as those conducted on platforms such as Slack — are often less welcoming to female employees, and Hive finds that men do actually participate in them a bit more than women do.

Chatting at work

Is the use of passive language still a gender issue?

There's a generally accepted narrative that women aren't being assertive enough at work in the word choices they use for communicating. Hive cites the Just Not Sorry Gmail plug-in that flags such shy language. However, Hive's research finds no evidence for this particular gender gap, showing that passive language is equally likely to be used by both women and men.

Using passive language at work

Are genders finally becoming integrated?

This one is a bit disheartening, and may speak to the inter-gender tensions — or at least lack of comfort — that afflicts our cultures as a result of past and continuing gender inequality.

When it comes to individual chats, we tend to text others of our own gender. And when it comes to handing off work to others, the same is true. This certainly helps perpetuate the habit of keeping women occupied with non-career-advancing work.

For some it's probably the result of continuing workplace tensions, but for others it may be just a well-ingrained habit: as if stuck at some never-ending high-school dance, we may be simply more comfortable among our own.

Gender integration at work

Do you get more done if you work on weekends?

One final thing Hive looked at was whether or not working on weekends — when the world is quieter and there are fewer disruptions breaking our workflows — is actually more productive. Short answer: nope. Men slightly work more on weekends than women, but they get less done, so…

There are definitely more productive times of day during the work week, though. At 10 a.m. you're, relatively speaking, a house afire, by 4 pm, it's all ashes and cinders.

Working weekends and most productive times

Snapshot of us

Hive's report provides a glimpse of how we work these days, and how much further we have yet to go when it comes to truly integrating men and women at work. High school has been over a long time for most of us. It's past time to grow up.

Neom, Saudi Arabia's $500 billion megacity, reaches its next phase

Construction of the $500 billion dollar tech city-state of the future is moving ahead.

Credit: Neom
Technology & Innovation
  • The futuristic megacity Neom is being built in Saudi Arabia.
  • The city will be fully automated, leading in health, education and quality of life.
  • It will feature an artificial moon, cloud seeding, robotic gladiators and flying taxis.
Keep reading Show less

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

Are we genetically inclined for superstition or just fearful of the truth?

Videos
  • From secret societies to faked moon landings, one thing that humanity seems to have an endless supply of is conspiracy theories. In this compilation, physicist Michio Kaku, science communicator Bill Nye, psychologist Sarah Rose Cavanagh, skeptic Michael Shermer, and actor and playwright John Cameron Mitchell consider the nature of truth and why some groups believe the things they do.
  • "I think there's a gene for superstition, a gene for hearsay, a gene for magic, a gene for magical thinking," argues Kaku. The theoretical physicist says that science goes against "natural thinking," and that the superstition gene persists because, one out of ten times, it actually worked and saved us.
  • Other theories shared include the idea of cognitive dissonance, the dangerous power of fear to inhibit critical thinking, and Hollywood's romanticization of conspiracies. Because conspiracy theories are so diverse and multifaceted, combating them has not been an easy task for science.

COVID-19 brain study to explore long-term effects of the virus

A growing body of research suggests COVID-19 can cause serious neurological problems.

Brain images of a patient with acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis.

Coronavirus
  • The new study seeks to track the health of 50,000 people who have tested positive for COVID-19.
  • The study aims to explore whether the disease causes cognitive impairment and other conditions.
  • Recent research suggests that COVID-19 can, directly or indirectly, cause brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage and other neurological problems.
Keep reading Show less
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation

Better reskilling can future-proof jobs in the age of automation. Enter SkillUp's new coalition.

Coronavirus layoffs are a glimpse into our automated future. We need to build better education opportunities now so Americans can find work in the economy of tomorrow.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast