This A.I. pocket device translates languages in real-time

The ONE Mini is a Swiss Army knife of translation tech, interpreting 12 different foreign languages with a host of features.

  • The ONE Mini translates and transcribe 12 languages in real time.
  • Advanced speech recognition tech produces text or verbal translations instantly.
  • Live premium translator service is available through ONE Mini.


Some of the best holiday gifts are the ones we never realized we desperately needed. And if you've watched much sci-fi, you've undoubtedly wished universal translators that bridged language gaps like magic were actually real.

Born of a $100,000 Kickstarter campaign, the ONE Mini Pocket Multilingual Assistant is that sci-fi dream brought to life. And for anyone on your holiday shopping list who travels, deals with foreign cultures or just enjoys an amazing tech innovation, it's a killer holiday gift option.

The ONE Mini is a Swiss Army knife of translation tech, interpreting 12 different foreign languages with a host of features. The audio recorder captures speech, then uses cutting-edge neural machine AI to produce highly accurate text or verbal translations. If you're in a foreign country, ONE Mini can literally be your voice as you navigate the culture.

ONE Mini also provides premium live interpreter service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for conversations that require more complex interaction. With a single button push, ONE Mini connects via Bluetooth with a qualified interpreter able to offer full nuanced communication so important details don't get lost in translation.

ONE Mini even works great as a wireless music player, clipping neatly to your clothes for hands-free use anywhere.

Buy now: The ONE Mini Pocket Multilingual Assistant is available at $40 off, just $59. The unit comes in four colors: black, silver, red and green.

Prices are subject to change.

ONE Mini Pocket Multilingual Assistant - $59

Get the deal for $59

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