Learn a topic in 12 minutes. This app boils non-fiction books down to their essence.

Get the whole 12min library now for just $29.

  • 12min summarizes hundreds of best-selling books down to essential 12-minute microbooks.
  • Microbooks are downloadable in both text and audio formats.
  • You can request a 12min summary of any non-fiction book not in their vast library.


You may be surprised to learn that it isn't youth-obsessed, phone-fixated millennials who aren't reading best-sellers anymore. It's actually your grandparents who aren't finding time to crack a book in 2019.

Statista says over 80 percent of adults between 18 and 29 years old reported reading a book last year. Meanwhile, that total drops the older one gets, resulting in just 2 out of 3 in the 50 to 64 age group being readers.

12min is for those who say they don't have time to read. They distill non-fiction best-sellers down to an essential 12 minute summary.

Their curated library of “micro books" breaks down all the key concepts and ideas from hundreds of best-sellers covering topics like finance, parenting, leadership, sales, productivity and more. Summaries can be saved in text or audio form for offline review, meaning whenever you can find 12 minutes in your day, you're always ready to learn something new.

The library adds about 30 new books a month—and if you can't find a summary of a particular book you're looking for, just recommend it to 12min and they may add it to their collection.

Buy now: A lifetime subscription to the 12min archive is over $340, but right now it's available for just $29. Or you can sample 12min for a year for just $19, still over 70 percent off.

Prices are subject to change.

12min Micro Book Library: Lifetime Premium Subscription - $29

Read 'em all for $29

When you buy something through a link in this article or from our shop, Big Think earns a small commission. Thank you for supporting our team's work.

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