This color-matching portable sensor is like Shazam for designers

Just point the Nix at your surface of choice and within seconds, this eagle-eyed sensor analyzes the pigment and points you to the closest color matches from all the biggest paint brands.

  • The Nix V2 scans any colored surface to find an exact color match.
  • The device cross-references against more than 100,000 brand name paint colors.
  • The Nix is currently $15 off the regular price.


If you know someone who spends a healthy chunk of their life or career dealing with color, we can help you introduce them to a serious game-changer. From fine artists to interior designers to graphics specialist to house painters, the power of the Nix Mini 2 Color Sensor will be like showing a carriage driver an internal combustion engine.

The Nix works like a Shazam for color matching. Just point the Nix at your surface of choice and within seconds, this eagle-eyed sensor analyzes the pigment and points you to the closest color matches from all the biggest paint brands.

And that means any surface, whether it’s a paint layer, vinyl, leather, plastic, fabric, dyes — you name it, Nix will find it.

And when we say the closest color matches, we mean matches almost indistinguishable to the naked eye. The Nix checks your choice against more than 100,000 brand name paint colors, as well as the full range of RGB, HEX, CMYK, and LAB hues.

With the full catalogues of makers like Benjamin Moore, Dulux, Farrow & Ball, Sherwin Williams and more, the Nix spits out all the specific color options from each manufacturer that’ll work for your project.

The Nix is lightweight and easily attaches to a keychain, making it a perfect on-the-go tool. Once you’re synced to the Nix app, you can also store and organize all your chosen colors and keep them on file for next time.

Buy now: The Nix retails for $99, so don’t miss out on the limited time deal to get one for your favorite color freak for only $84.

Prices are subject to change.

Nix Mini Color Sensor V2 - $84

Get Nixxed for $84

When you buy something through a link in this article or from our shop, Big Think earns a small commission. Thank you for supporting our team's work.

More From Big Think
Related Articles

In praise of nudity: The nudist beaches of Central and Eastern Europe

"Nothing but naked people: fat ones, thin ones, old, young…"

Photo by Jessica D. Vega on Unsplash
Culture & Religion
They lie on towels, blankets and mattresses, without wind screens, but under umbrellas.
Keep reading Show less

Earth’s first lifeforms breathed arsenic

The microbes that eventually produced the planet's oxygen had to breathe something, after all.

Credit: BRONWYN GUDGEON/Shutterstock
Surprising Science
  • We owe the Earth's oxygen to ancient microbes that photosynthesized and released it into the world's oceans.
  • A long-standing question has been "before oxygen, what did they breathe?"
  • The discovery of microbes living in a hostile early-Earth-like environment may provide the answer.
Keep reading Show less

3D bioprinting could manufacture donor organs. In space!

Techshot's 3D BioFabrication Facility successfully printed human heart tissue aboard the International Space Station.

Surprising Science
  • Bioprinting soft human tissues has always been a challenge for bioprinters.
  • Techshot's 3D BioFabrication Facility utilized the microgravity of space to successfully manufacture human heart tissues.
  • While complete-organ manufacturing remains years away, the technology provides a promising step toward easing wait lists and personalized medicine.
  • Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast