How to change bad habits and learn new skills

You can change your brain at any age thanks to neuroplasticity.

  • Neuroplasticity is your brain's ability to form new neuronal connections throughout your life.
  • It is possible to change your habits and learn new skills at any age thanks to neuroplasticity.
  • Training your brain to form new connections is beneficial to long-term cognitive health.

For a long time, it was believed that your brain was solidified during adolescence. After your teenage years, you are who you are, with no possibility of change. The neuroscience revolution of the 20th century proved this assumption to be wrong. It is possible to change at any age thanks to your brain's ability to form new neuronal connections.

In the course, Neuroplasticity: How To Rewire Your Brain, psychologist Gregory Caremans, the former Director of the Institute of Neurocognitivism in Brussels, teaches you how to form these connections. His insightful and easy-to-implement lessons include the ability to create cognitive flexibility, form new habits, override unhelpful thought patterns, and choose and stick to resolutions.

Whether you want to advance in your career or reach new goals in your personal life, making the effort to rewire your brain can give you a major edge.

With Neuroplasticity: How To Rewire Your Brain, Caremans offers lifetime access to two-and-a-half hours of incredible content for only $10.99, a 92% discount off of the original price. It's never too late to train your brain for the better.

Price subject to change.

When you buy something through a link in this article or from our shop, Big Think earns a small commission. Thank you for supporting our team's work.

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According to Thomas Peacock, professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, "This new tool we've provided can be run on various models to see where these traps are predicted to be, and thus the most likely locations for a stranded vessel or missing person." He adds that, "This method uses data in a way that it hasn't been used before, so it provides first responders with a new perspective."

A Eulerian approach

Device used in test

Image source: MIT

The TRAPS acronym stands for "TRansient Attracting Profiles." It's an algorithm based on a Eulerian mathematical system developed by lead study author Mattia Serra and corresponding author George Haller of ETH Zurich. It's designed to discover hidden attracting fluidic structures in an onrush of changing data.

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At sea

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Image source: MIT

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Anchors aweigh

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