Master a second language in easy 10-15 minute blocks

Babbel is developed by over 100 linguistic experts and its speech recognition technology assesses your pronunciation so it's "fi 'ahsan al'ahwal" every time.

  • A lifetime Babbel subscription can help you learn up to 14 popular languages.
  • 10-to-15 minute language lessons focus on building basic conversational skills.
  • Babbel's speech recognition technology monitors and assesses your verbal performance.


As any high school junior will tell you, learning a new language isn’t easy. Even if you’re interested and motivated, it can often be difficult to find the time to keep up with lessons and the much-needed practice to get fluent in your new tongue.

Babbel captured its place as the no. 1 top-grossing language learning app in the world by creating a program with the time issue firmly in mind. Developed by over 100 linguistic experts, Babbel training is structured into easily digestible 10 to 15 minute lessons that can fit effortlessly into your schedule.

This lifetime access can get you on the way to full comprehension and fluency in 14 of the world’s most popular languages. Each lesson works on building your basic conversational skills, guiding you through useful real life subjects like travel, family, business, food and more.

Meanwhile, Babbel’s own personalized lesson reviews help make sure each new training takes root, plus their speech recognition technology assesses your pronunciation so you don’t just understand your new language, but speak it correctly as well.

Within one month, Babbel says their coursework can get you speaking confidently in your new language. It’s just up to you to dive in and get started.

Buy now: A $399 Babbel lifetime access subscription is available now at 60% off, only $159.

Prices are subject to change.

Babbel Language Learning: Lifetime Subscription (All Languages) - $159

Get talking now for $159

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