Instantly translate your voice into 110+ languages from your device

Sheltering at home won't last forever. This translator is a traveler's best friend.

  • LingvaNex Translator lets you speak to your Uber driver, B&B host, or waiter in almost any country with ease.
  • The dictionary function helps you use foreign words in the right context.
  • You can instantly translate text on image and websites.

We might be sheltering at home right now, but that won't last forever. Though you may be brushing up on your language skills during this time, the ability to talk to anyone in the world is a skillset beyond most humans.

That's where LingvaNex Translator comes in. This unique program lets you read, write, and speak in over 110 languages. This powerful translation and dictionary app offers instant translations of text, voice, images, websites, and documents. Right now, LingvaNex Translator: Lifetime Subscription (Desktop and Mobile Bundle) is on sale for 80% off, just $79.99.

That means you'll never have to flip through a book you picked up at the airport or scroll through local search apps hoping to find the right words. In fact, the dictionary even helps you nail the context.

You don't even need to travel to use LingvaNex Translator. Discover what's happening overseas from local news sources, and even translate text on images. You can save your favorite translations in the bookmarks and revisit them to help grow your vocabulary over time.

Lingvanex Translator is available on mobile or desktop for iOS, Android, macOS, and Windows users. Apple users rate it 4/5 stars on the Mac App Store, while Google Play and Microsoft Store users both give it 4.4/5 stars.

Purchase LingvaNex Translator: Lifetime Subscription (Desktop and Mobile Bundle) today for just $79.99 and save 80% off the list price.

Price subject to change.

When you buy something through a link in this article or from our shop, Big Think earns a small commission. Thank you for supporting our team's work.

More from the Big Think Shop


More From Big Think
Related Articles

Could muons point to new physics?

New data have set the particle physics community abuzz.

Credit: Stefano Garau / Adobe Stock and Trahko / Adobe Stock
13-8
  • The first question ever asked in Western philosophy, "What's the world made of?" continues to inspire high energy physicists.
  • New experimental results probing the magnetic properties of the muon, a heavier cousin of the electron, seem to indicate that new particles of nature may exist, potentially shedding light on the mystery of dark matter.
  • The results are a celebration of the human spirit and our insatiable curiosity to understand the world and our place in it.
Keep reading Show less
Credit: William Thomas Cain via Getty Images
Personal Growth
  • Benjamin Franklin wrote essays on a whole range of subjects, but one of his finest was on how to be a nice, likable person.
  • Franklin lists a whole series of common errors people make while in the company of others, like over-talking or storytelling.
  • His simple recipe for being good company is to be genuinely interested in others and to accept them for who they are.
Keep reading Show less

Our ancestors first developed humanlike brains 1.7 million years ago

A recent study analyzed the skulls of early Homo species to learn more about the evolution of primate brains.

Credit: M. Ponce de León and Ch.Zollikofer, UZH
Surprising Science
  • Using computed tomography, a team of researchers generated images of what the brains of early Homo species likely looked like.
  • The team then compared these images to the brains of great apes and modern humans.
  • The results suggest that Homo species developed humanlike brains about 1.7 million years ago and that this cognitive evolution occurred at the same time early Homo culture and technology were becoming more complex.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast