Microsoft Excel doesn’t have to be scary. This $29.99 training breaks it all down.

Get the absolute most out of what Excel can do with this incredible course and become a productivity master. Right now, it's 90% off the regular price.

  • The Complete Microsoft Excel and VBA Bundle offers full Excel 2019, 2016 and 2013 training.
  • The package also shows how to use VBA, Excel's key programming language.
  • The $300 package is on sale now for just $29.99.

If you’re looking to save time and be more efficient, Microsoft Excel is a very useful tool to get you there. For organization and data management, there’s probably never been a more impactful day-to-day aid than Excel. But just like anything else, you’ll only get out of Excel what you put in.

You’ll learn all the steps for getting the absolute most out of what Excel can do with the massive Complete Microsoft Excel and VBA Bundle of coursework. Right now, it’s marked down to just $29.99, a 90 percent savings off the regular price.

This collection features nine courses covering every facet of the latest three Excel iterations, Microsoft Excel 2013, 2016 and 2019. Across more than 65 hours of training, your exposure to each will showcase areas where heavy users can find the best shortcuts and efficiency tips for getting the most out of your Excel time.

Whether you need to know how to create workbooks, enter data, use functions and formulas or even run more complex duties like connecting to datasets outside of Excel or using advanced charts like Surface, Radar, Bubble or more, it’s all right here.

Meanwhile, you’ll also get two courses in the use of Microsoft VBA. In Essential VBA Training for Excel: Automate Repetitive Tasks and VBA Intermediate Training: Discover Excel Automation Secrets, you’ll understand how to use VBA, the programming language that drives Excel. Armed with that knowledge, you’ll be ready to create automation and special macros in Excel that can save hours of tedious data entry and other time-consuming Excel tasks.

A $300 value, this entire collection is available now at 90 percent off, only $29.99 while this offer lasts.

Prices are subject to change.

The Complete Microsoft Excel & VBA Bundle - $29.99

Learn Excel for $29.99

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