Tweet to Win VIP Seats at the New York Public Library's Floating University Event

 

Tweet to Win VIP Seats at the New York Public Library's Floating University Event

We here at the Floating University are excited to announce a promotion for our LIVE event next week at the New York Public Library: Anyone who follows us on Twitter (@FloatingU) and sends us an @ reply with the phrase "Art Now" will automatically win a free VIP seat to Bard President Leon Botstein's lecture screening and live Q&A on Wednesday, February 29th.


In addition, anyone who "likes" this post on Facebook will win a VIP voucher to bring. 

The promotion starts now and ends on Sunday, February 26th at 11:59 PM. Follow us on Twitter and check out the event details below, along with a sample clip. Everyone wins! You simply need to USE THIS BUTTON here:

Art Now: Aesthetics Across Music, Painting, Architecture, Movies, and More - A Lecture by Leon Botstein

Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 6 - 8 p.mThe New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

It is one of the most debated subjects of all time: What is art? Some might think it doesn't much matter whether or not consensus is achieved on this highly subjective topic, but the definition of art has an enormous impact upon how the arts are — or aren't — funded. The question of what constitutes art spills over into debates about art's value to society — whether access to the arts is right as basic as education or health care. In this video lecture from The Floating University, Bard College President Leon Botstein explains why it is essential to ask these questions and offers a sturdy basis for evaluating them. He goes so far as to suggest that engaging with art can give our lives meaning and purpose. Following the one-hour screening, Leon Botstein will hold a Q&A to discuss the issues brought up by the lecture. 

Doors open at 5:30 and seating is first-come first-serve. Check out the official page here.

The New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, and is easily accessible by the 1/2/3, A/C, D/B/F/M, 4/5/6, and 7 trains that converge at or around Grand Central Station. 

Watch this exclusive sample from President Botstein's lecture:


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