Hilariously Stupid Science Questions

"There's no such thing as a stupid question." We'd now like to present eleven more, courtesy of the same esteemed panel of "logic-dodging" jokesters over at Reddit that came up with the original list. 

This post originally appeared on the Newton blog at RealClearScience. Read the original here


Back in September, we shared eleven questions that would make even the most understanding science teacher take back the saying, "There's no such thing as a stupid question." We'd now like to present eleven more, courtesy of the same esteemed panel of "logic-dodging" jokesters over at Reddit that came up with the original list:

If setting off nukes creates "nuclear winters", why don't we set off a few nukes to offset global warming?

If electricity always follows the path of least resistance, why doesn't lightning only strike in France?

What happens if a very stoppable force meets a very movable object?

If Pi is never ending, why is there still world hunger?

Is HIV considered a "retro virus" because it started to be a problem in the 80s?

Why does alcohol need proofs? Shouldn't we just take their word for it?

Do strippers in the southern hemisphere spin around their poles in the opposite direction as strippers in the northern hemisphere?

If sound can't travel through vacuums, why are they so loud?

How can we trust atoms if they make up everything?

If there's a new moon every month. Where does the old one go?

Why did ancient people bury so many buildings?

How can fish hold their breath for so long underwater?

If Corn Oil is made from corn, and Olive Oil is made from olives, where does Baby Oil come from? (from TeamRed_vs_TeamBlue)

via Reddit


(Image: Secret Ingredient via Shutterstock)

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