The Innovation Ecosystem blog analyzes Brand Evolution

With much of the mainstream business media focusing on rapid, revolutionary change, it's always a treat to discover bloggers and consultants who adopt more of an evolutionary view of business innovation. For example, Julie Fleischer, the Innovation Thought Leader for Egg Strategy, has been publishing a blog since December 2006 called Innovation Ecosystem that looks at how concepts related to evolution and ecosystems can be used to understand business strategy and marketing. As Julie explains at the top of her Innovation Ecosystem blog, "great innovation happens organically, with

sloppy edges and growth spurts. Because as with nature, innovation

doesn't take place in a vacuum - it is dependent upon and interrelated

to all things around it. And because innovation needs to be cognizant

of the ripple effect -- seeing opportunities AND managing potential

damage. Innovation thrives on change, curiosity, and desire."

For example, citing a recent cover story in Newsweek ("The Evolution Revolution"), Julie points out what evolution means for corporate brands:

"The cover story of the 3.19 issue of Newsweek is fascinating... We're now learning that evolution is not a straight-lined

path of progress. It occurs in fits and starts, with many adaptations

failing to take root. We're discovering an evolutionary family tree of

sorts, with a number of adaptive traits developing, hanging around for

several million years or so, and then becoming extinct. Progress is

lumpy.


And that's where brands come in.  Brand evolution is rarely a straight line path of forward progress.

Quite often, brand adaptations (let's call them line extensions or

flankers) come to market, score sufficient volume to hang around for

several years, and then make way for a new generation of extensions.

This process may continue on ad infinitum without ever really evolving the brand - making it more relevant, more contemporary, competitively advantaged.

Survival of the fittest is about more than merely hanging in there.

For

a brand to truly evolve, it needs to move beyond these experiments and

take a strategic view toward innovation of the entire ecosystem.

Perhaps the business model needs to evolve (see Netflix vs. Blockbuster

below). Perhaps the brand needs a different approach regarding channels

or supply chain. Maybe the consumer situation (the human genomic code?)

has changed and new needs have arisen, requiring repositioning or

structural packaging innovation. Maybe a new predator has emerged that

forces the brand to take a more defensive - or offensive - posture. Just as our species need to evolve, so do our brands.  Settling

for "natural growth" only gets you so far - hyperadaptation of the

innovation ecosystem is needed to grow the legs that take you out of

the swamp

."

[image: Newsweek]

A still from the film "We Became Fragments" by Luisa Conlon , Lacy Roberts and Hanna Miller, part of the Global Oneness Project library.

Photo: Luisa Conlon , Lacy Roberts and Hanna Miller / Global Oneness Project
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Stories are at the heart of learning, writes Cleary Vaughan-Lee, Executive Director for the Global Oneness Project. They have always challenged us to think beyond ourselves, expanding our experience and revealing deep truths.
  • Vaughan-Lee explains 6 ways that storytelling can foster empathy and deliver powerful learning experiences.
  • Global Oneness Project is a free library of stories—containing short documentaries, photo essays, and essays—that each contain a companion lesson plan and learning activities for students so they can expand their experience of the world.
Keep reading Show less

Four philosophers who realized they were completely wrong about things

Philosophers like to present their works as if everything before it was wrong. Sometimes, they even say they have ended the need for more philosophy. So, what happens when somebody realizes they were mistaken?

Sartre and Wittgenstein realize they were mistaken. (Getty Images)
Culture & Religion

Sometimes philosophers are wrong and admitting that you could be wrong is a big part of being a real philosopher. While most philosophers make minor adjustments to their arguments to correct for mistakes, others make large shifts in their thinking. Here, we have four philosophers who went back on what they said earlier in often radical ways. 

Keep reading Show less

The history of using the Insurrection Act against Americans

Numerous U.S. Presidents invoked the Insurrection Act to to quell race and labor riots.

The army during riots in Washington, DC, after the assassination of civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr., April 1968.

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • U.S. Presidents have invoked the Insurrection Act on numerous occasions.
  • The controversial law gives the President some power to bring in troops to police the American people.
  • The Act has been used mainly to restore order following race and labor riots.
Keep reading Show less

Facebook finally adds option to delete old posts in batches

Got any embarrassing old posts collecting dust on your profile? Facebook wants to help you delete them.

Facebook
Technology & Innovation
  • The feature is called Manage Activity, and it's currently available through mobile and Facebook Lite.
  • Manage Activity lets users sort old content by filters like date and posts involving specific people.
  • Some companies now use AI-powered background checking services that scrape social media profiles for problematic content.
Keep reading Show less
Scroll down to load more…