The 800-desktop millstone [SCENARIO]

Introducing a new feature here, here's a school technology leadership scenario for you...


SCENARIO: You're a new central office administrator in a growing district. Just a few months into the job you learn that the new high school your district is building - which was originally designed 3 to 4 years ago and is supposed to open next fall - is about to order 800 new desktop computers and put them into rooms configured as stationary computer labs. You know that computing is moving toward mobile, not tethered, environments and that universities, for example, are quickly getting away from labs altogether. The rooms are already built and wired, but you're concerned about investing a significant amount of money in technologies that may not best meet the present and future needs of students and staff.

YOUR TURN: How do you handle this? Do you let this one go and fight other battles? Or do you take this on and try and stop the already-moving train (and, if so, what's your approach)?

Got a school technology leadership scenario to share? Send it to me and I'll see if we can post it. Make sure to let me know if you want your name attached or if you want to stay anonymous!

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