Struggling with educators' lack of technology fluency

Struggling with educators' lack of technology fluency

It's 2012. Technology suffuses everything around us. The Internet and Internet browsers have been pretty mainstream for at least a decade.


And yet, I continually run into significant numbers of educators who still don't know how to work their Internet browser. They struggle with copying and pasting. They get confused just clicking between 2 or 3 different browser tabs. They don't conceptually understand the difference between their browser's Google search box and the box where they can actually type in the URL and get there directly. They have no idea that they can right-click on things like hyperlinks or images. And so on… [And this is just the Internet browser. I'm not even talking about individual software programs or online tools.]

What hope do these teachers have of providing meaningful, technology-rich learning experiences for their students? What hope do these leaders have of creating and adequately supporting powerful, technology-rich learning environments for students and staff? Little to none.

Is it even possible to get these educators to where they need to be? How are we going to do what we need to do for our kids when our current levels of technology fluency and understanding are so low?

Can you tell I'm really struggling with this lately?

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