Do Black Holes Exist in Our Sub-Atomic World?

Black holes are spheres in space, and not the funnel shaped objects so often depicted in science fiction. They are defined by the speed of particles traveling towards their core. But they are controlled by the rate of change in that speed. The force of gravity can be expressed in kilometers per second per second. The creation and destruction of black holes can be understood in terms of a pendulum. When the inward force of a black hole is at its maximum, the pendulum is in mid-swing going in one direction. As a visible object approaches the mid-point, it reaches a speed that exceeds the speed of light and becomes a black hole. As it moves past that mid-point, it begins slowing down again. When its speed drops below that of the speed of light it becomes visible again and is no longer a black hole.  Do black holes exist in our sub-atomic world and, if so, how do we detect them?

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A new study estimated the untapped potential of wind energy across Europe.

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Surprising Science
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Surprising Science
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You want one. Now you may be able to survive one.


Photo credit: Jie Zhao
/ Getty contributor
Technology & Innovation
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