This Innovative Solution Takes Printed Media into the Future

This Innovative Solution Takes Printed Media into the Future

On June 19, the world's first automatic magazine newsstand reached the Swedish consumers. Meganews Magazines is up and running in Stockholm, hoping to change the modern media landscape. The newsstand kiosk allows for on the spot, high quality, color prints of a wide range of magazines and periodicals (200 at present). 


In order to survive, print media has to find a way to reach new readers, find new means of distribution, and reduce the cost of production. The Meganews Magazines newsstand addresses each of these problems and more. The machine (which takes up space of less than 4 square meters) allows customers to choose the publication they want to buy via a touchscreen, pay with a credit card, and get a copy, printed on the spot, in two minutes. The newsstand is connected to the internet and can download upon request the latest pdf files from any partner publisher's server.

According to Stefan Melesko, a lecturer in Media Economics, 10% of the entire cost structure for most publications consists of distribution costs. In addition, publishers produce a surplus of copies, at times being unable to sell up to 30-40% of them and accruing additional expenses for handling the returns. On-demand printing newsstands like Meganews Magazines can save publishers money on printing and distribution. They can also help them reach customers whenever and wherever, while giving them realtime feedback on sales. The service can be incredibly useful to niche publishers who would otherwise not be able to reach new audiences because they can't afford to distribute to all outlets.

An additional benefit, not a small one at all, is that the service is environmentally friendlier. Meganews Sweden commissioned a Life Cycle Assessment of their product, which concluded that "approximately 60 percent lower emissions of fossil greenhouse gases were generated during the life cycle of a magazine printed and sold in a Meganews Magazine kiosk compared to a magazine printed and distributed in the traditional way, including unsolds."

Meganews Sweden has already secured partnerships with the leading publishing houses in Sweden and hopes to soon expand its services to include foreign publications. It's certainly exciting to see how this new way of distributing and selling printed media will develop. 

via Springwise

Were the ancient Egyptians black or white? Scientists now know

This is the first successful DNA sequencing on ancient Egyptian mummies, ever.

 

Ancient Egyptian Statues

Getty Images
Surprising Science

Egyptologists, writers, scholars, and others, have argued the race of the ancient Egyptians since at least the 1970's. Some today believe they were Sub-Saharan Africans. We can see this interpretation portrayed in Michael Jackson's 1991 music video for “Remember the Time" from his "Dangerous" album. The video, a 10-minute mini-film, includes performances by Eddie Murphy and Magic Johnson.

Keep reading Show less

Why professional soccer players choke during penalty kicks

A new study used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure brain activity as inexperienced and experienced soccer players took penalty kicks.

PORTLAND, OREGON - MAY 09: Diego Valeri #8 of Portland Timbers reacts after missing a penalty kick in the second half against the Seattle Sounders at Providence Park on May 09, 2021 in Portland, Oregon.

Abbie Parr via Getty Images
Mind & Brain
  • The new study is the first to use in-the-field imaging technology to measure brain activity as people delivered penalty kicks.
  • Participants were asked to kick a total of 15 penalty shots under three different scenarios, each designed to be increasingly stressful.
  • Kickers who missed shots showed higher activity in brain areas that were irrelevant to kicking a soccer ball, suggesting they were overthinking.
Keep reading Show less

Changing a brain to save a life: how far should rehabilitation go?

What's the difference between brainwashing and rehabilitation?

Credit: Roy Rochlin via Getty Images
Mind & Brain
  • The book and movie, A Clockwork Orange, powerfully asks us to consider the murky lines between rehabilitation, brainwashing, and dehumanization.
  • There are a variety of ways, from hormonal treatment to surgical lobotomies, to force a person to be more law abiding, calm, or moral.
  • Is a world with less free will but also with less suffering one in which we would want to live?
Keep reading Show less
Surprising Science

How to fool a shark using magnets

A simple trick allowed marine biologists to prove a long-held suspicion.

Quantcast