This Awesome LEGO-Compatible Tape Has Raised More than $1.4M on Indiegogo

You know what would make LEGO even better? A base tape that lets you build against gravity.

The creators of the Nimuno Loops tape have done some genius inventing bringing us a product that makes you wonder why no one else has come up with it before.


They have created the world's first toy block compatible tape — simple, versatile, cheap, and promising unlimited creative possibilities.

The tape has an adhesive back, and a front featuring the familiar toy block bumps that make it compatible with LEGO bricks, Mega Bloks, Kreo, and most major toy-building block systems. This means you can stick the tape to almost any surface then build your heart out on top of it. 

The creators of the tape, Anine Kirsten and Max Basler, are professional industrial designers based in South Africa who have focused most of their work on toys that engage children with the physical world and encourage creativity. 

Just a few days after launching their crowdfunding campaign they surpassed the original goal of $8,000 and now stand at almost $1.5 million. Following this unexpected success, they have released more colors and sizes.

For $13, a backer can get a 6.5 ft roll of the tape. We're looking forward to seeing all the original Nimuno Loops applications.

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