Open Planet Ideas: Sony + WWF Crowdsource Tech Innovation

Several weeks ago, we featured OpenIDEO – innovation consultancy IDEO's collaborative platform for concepting and implementing social-good projects. Open Planet Ideas, a partnership between Sony and WWF, is using IDEO's platform to crowdsource and realize ideas about using technology for maximizing the planet's resources.


Based on existing Sony technologies ripe for repurposing, participants are invited to reinvent their design, function and application in radical ways that make for a cleaner, more sustainable future.

The challenge is currently in the concepting phase, with 109 generated to date based on the 335 inspirations shared in the first phase. Phase 3, Evaluation, begins on December 6 and the final winning idea is announced on January 11, after which implementation will begin.

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Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings, a curated inventory of miscellaneous interestingness. She writes for Wired UK, GOOD Magazine, Design Observer and Huffington Post, and spends a shameful amount of time on Twitter.

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