Weekend Coffee: October 7

Some links gathered over the week for you to peruse:


Ed Miliband, the leader of the UK's opposition Labour party, is a nonbeliever. He says he doesn't hold religious faith, but rather a faith in human progress. This column by Fraser Nelson admits that this may be a smart move in increasingly secular Britain, which is no longer a Christian country "but... still a country of compassion and principles".

• A UK judge rules that parents have "no sacred right" over the education of their children, ruling against an ultra-Orthodox father who wanted his children to have only religious schooling.

A New York City investment banker with terminal brain cancer wins the right to die, over opposition from religious parents (one of them a pastor) who told her that turning off life support would be committing suicide and would send her to hell, and who tried to have her declared legally incompetent when she persisted.

• A Republican member of the House Science Committee, Georgia Rep. Paul Broun, hates science and calls evolution and the Big Bang "lies from the pit of Hell".

• At least some theists understand that the way to respond to bad speech is with better speech.

• Welcome news: Saudi Arabia promises to curb the power of its notorious morality police, most infamous for forcing schoolgirls back into a burning building because they weren't wearing the appropriate Islamic dress to appear in public.

• Another day, another case in which the Catholic church allegedly helped an accused pedophile escape justice.

• It pained me to read this, but I'm glad it was written: a lengthy article laying out damning evidence that Thomas Jefferson actively condoned and perpetuated slavery on his Monticello estate when he realized how profitable it was for him. Coming from a man who wrote so powerfully about human liberty, and whose fiery denunciation of the slave trade nearly derailed American independence, this is a necessary reminder that even intellectual greats aren't immune from gross hypocrisy.

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

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Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

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Dead – yes, dead – tardigrade found beneath Antarctica

A completely unexpected discovery beneath the ice.

(Goldstein Lab/Wkikpedia/Tigerspaws/Big Think)
Surprising Science
  • Scientists find remains of a tardigrade and crustaceans in a deep, frozen Antarctic lake.
  • The creatures' origin is unknown, and further study is ongoing.
  • Biology speaks up about Antarctica's history.
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This 1997 Jeff Bezos interview proves he saw the future coming

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.com, explains his plan for success.

Technology & Innovation
  • Jeff Bezos had a clear vision for Amazon.com from the start.
  • He was inspired by a statistic he learned while working at a hedge fund: In the '90s, web usage was growing at 2,300% a year.
  • Bezos explains why books, in particular, make for a perfect item to sell on the internet.
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Why are women more religious than men? Because men are more willing to take risks.

It's one factor that can help explain the religiosity gap.

Photo credit: Alina Strong on Unsplash
Culture & Religion
  • Sociologists have long observed a gap between the religiosity of men and women.
  • A recent study used data from several national surveys to compare religiosity, risk-taking preferences and demographic information among more than 20,000 American adolescents.
  • The results suggest that risk-taking preferences might partly explain the gender differences in religiosity.
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