Can scientists agree on a code of ethics?

Can scientists agree on a code of ethics? The World Economic Forum Young Scientists community just proposed a Code of Ethics, which was a topic of discussion at the recent World Economic Forum's meeting in Davos, Switzerland.

Scientists typically aim to be ethical, but can they agree on a general code of ethics? 


That was a topic of conversation at the recent World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting held in Davos, Switzerland. The World Economic Forum's stated goal for the gathering is that by "coming together at the start of the year, we can shape the future by joining this unparalleled global effort in co-design, co-creation and collaboration." Building on this year's theme of "Creating a Shared Future in a Fractured World," there was a lively panel discussion around "A Code of Ethics for Science." 

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