Social Marketing = Short and Shareable (and frequent!)

Good social media marketing is reliant on frequent, short, and shareable/shareworthy content posting. This is because content is how you get people to move through the brand engagement funnel.


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When I was speaking at the AMA a few weeks ago, my co-presentor and I prepared the following social marketing funnel:
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Here’s the phase definitions:

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  1. Unknown — the person is unfamiliar with your brand on social networks
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  3. Attention — you do something that catches the attention of the person
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  5. Line of Engagement — if your attention gathering event (or events) got a good reception, your audience will subscribe for more.
  6. \n
  7. Relationship — this is where users are encouraged to begin to moving through the “brand engagement funnel” by taking increasingly more brand friendly actions.
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  9. Line of Trust — Once a user has learned through experience to trust you, then they will be more likely to convert into paying customers and/or serve as a brand ambassador.
  10. \n
  11. Advocacy — User will create value for you through buying something ($$$) or telling their friends (NPS).
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Getting someone’s attention might require something more stunty then content, but once someone has passed the line of engagement, and is starting to move through the engagement funnel, the best way to convert that person is simple: keep good quality messaging coming. Those messages should be short (<255 characters), contain engaging content, and be something that your users either a) viscerally enjoy (game) or b) will get credit from their friends for finding (utility).

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Email me for more info or with your thoughts on the issue.  willis.tyler@gmail.com

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###  Unrelated:
\n* I’m struggling with a “Personal CRM” problem — remembering to stay in touch with people in my network during a fast-growth phase of a company is very difficult. Do you have any recommendations for a system or piece of software to solve this issue?

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* The act of codifying information as I discover it helps me think more concretely about it’s value to myself and to others. I’d love a contact system and a bookmarking system that used game mechanics and public comparison to force me to codify links and people for proper future finding. Right now I codify many interesting web pages at http://www.delicious.com/tylerwillis

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By the way:
\nI’ve refreshed the design here. It’s subtle, but I cleaned up the sidebars, removed some legacy javascript code that was slowing down the site, and added some recent speaking engagements to the site. Hope you enjoy it!

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