Digital Publishing Workflow Management

I have a serious problem with how I find, attend to, curate, add to, and finally, publish information. Here’s my basic flow today:


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  • I use Facebook, Twitter, RSS, email and web-browsing to find interesting items.
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  • Then I use Google Reader Shared Items, Twitter Starred Items, Facebook Likes, Instapaper, Delicious, and Tumblr Likes to store the things that get my attention.
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  • Finally I publish a subset of those to 2 Tumblr Blogs, Twitter, Facebook, and this blog to capture ideas and share what I find interesting
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  • I’d like to review everything from a certain time period and collect the best ones for sending in an email (and I’d love a tool to help judge which in that mountain of sources got the most reaction from the world).
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This is broken I need help in fixing this, and it could be helped by a very simple workflow tool.

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I’d also like whatever tools I use to collect items that get my attention to add a data layer that I can use to make interesting connections later (example: tags in delicious).  Taxonomies and codification is good because it helps me understand the information better, however, I need to understand how I’m going to reference that taxonomy later if I’m expected to keep it up manually.

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How many people have this problem? Is there a niche market product for this serving bloggers/journalists/intellectuals here?  What would a well-built “publishing workflow management for teams of 1″ look like?

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Anyone wanna ruminate on this one with me?  I have several ideas.

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