Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Creation and design

'Complexity implies design and therefore creation' is basically the creationist's point. 'How can all this (usually indicating a natural phenomenon that inspires awe or an organism that appears particular well suited to its environment) have come about by chance it must be design?'


 

To unpick this question requires a more than superficial understanding of what we mean by complexity, design and chance.

 

Think of chance and one thinks of throwing a couple of dice and extrapolates this to 'let's throw atoms into the air and isn't it unlikely that they fall into a complex pattern like an animal?' Thinking of chance on a human timescale is not comparable to a spacetime scale of 13 billion years and 100 billion light years.  It requires a good grasp of non-intuitive probability theory to really understand this.

 

Think of design and we have a person labouring away over schematics putting bits together - a watchmaker.

 

Our only understanding of creation and design is an evolutionary process. No human designed thing springs fully formed from the mind. We are inspired by things we see, we manipulate the environment we try things out, we modify sometimes over generations of use and gradually design improves. Our understanding of design is much more like evolution than it is like spontaneous creation. Creation and design are simply misnomers; they give the appearance of explaining something when in fact they do not.

 

Complexity: we have nothing to compare anything to. Every element of the universe is complex to a degree beyond our understanding. Since everything is complex we have nothing to compare degrees of complexity to. Thus it is meaningless to assert that complexity is an indicator of anything.  

 

We regard things as complex because we can't understand and duplicate them. Why should we be able to and why does our failing imply anything? As technology progresses we regard more things as comprehensible. A computer with its software would be unfathomably complex to a person of a 100 years ago. The human genome was incomprehensibly complex fifty years ago. We progress, complexity unwinds.

  

Live on Tuesday | Personal finance in the COVID-19 era

Sallie Krawcheck and Bob Kulhan will be talking money, jobs, and how the pandemic will disproportionally affect women's finances.

4 ways to promote neurogenesis in your brain

How can we promote the creation of new neurons - and why is it so important?

We can promote the development of new neurons well into adulthood - and here's why we should.

Image by vrx on Shutterstock
Mind & Brain
  • Neurogenesis, the birth of neurons from stem cells, happens mostly before we are born - as we are formed in the womb, we are generating most of what we need after birth.
  • After birth, neurogenesis is still possible in two parts of the brain: the olfactory bulb (which is responsible for our sense of smell) and the hippocampus (which is responsible for memory, spatial navigation, and emotional processing).
  • Research from the 1960s proves creating new neurons as adults is possible, and modern-day research explains how (and why) we should promote new neuron growth.
Keep reading Show less

Why is everyone so selfish? Science explains

The coronavirus pandemic has brought out the perception of selfishness among many.

Credit: Adobe Stock, Olivier Le Moal.
Personal Growth
  • Selfish behavior has been analyzed by philosophers and psychologists for centuries.
  • New research shows people may be wired for altruistic behavior and get more benefits from it.
  • Crisis times tend to increase self-centered acts.
Keep reading Show less

How Hemingway felt about fatherhood

Parenting could be a distraction from what mattered most to him: his writing.

Ernest Hemingway Holding His Son 1927 (Wikimedia Commons)
Culture & Religion

Ernest Hemingway was affectionately called “Papa," but what kind of dad was he?

Keep reading Show less
Videos

The biology of aliens: How much do we know?

Hollywood has created an idea of aliens that doesn't match the science.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast