Here's What Puerto Rico Looks Like After Hurricane Maria

The US island territory of Puerto Rico, recently devastated by category 4 hurricane Maria, remains without electricity.

The US island territory of Puerto Rico, recently devastated by category 4 hurricane Maria, remains without electricity and, according to Puerto Rican officials, 60 percent of population is now homeless and lacking potable water. While the federal government of the United States has dispersed relief aid, damage leveled against Puerto Rico's airports and seaports has complicated efforts to supply relief.


Hurricane Irma, which preceded Maria, did far less damage to the island, but revealed infrastructure problems in a place which is entirely dependent on the outside world for resources. In the aftermath of Maria, it is believed that 80 percent of Puerto Rico's crops are destroyed

Jaime Degraff sits outside as he tries to stay cool as people wait for the damaged electrical grid to be fixed after Hurricane Maria passed through the area on September 23, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 23


(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

People are transported down a road flooded by Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catanon, Puerto Rico, on September 21, 2017. Puerto Rico was facing dangerous flooding and an island-wide power outage on Thursday following Hurricane Maria as the death toll from the powerful storm topped 15 in the tiny Caribbean island of Dominica.

(HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

People stand among their home that was damaged when Hurricane Maria passed through the area on September 24, 2017 in Progreso Barrio Pulguillas, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. PROGRESO BARRIO PULGUILLAS, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 24

(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)


A cow lays dead on the ground in Ingenio, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, on September 22, 2017. Puerto Rico battled dangerous floods Friday after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island, as rescuers raced against time to reach residents trapped in their homes and the death toll climbed to 33. Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello called Maria the most devastating storm in a century after it destroyed the US territory's electricity and telecommunications infrastructure.


(HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

A house destroyed by hurricane winds is seen in Barranquitas, southwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria.


(RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images)

A man walks from Juncos to Las Piers town in search of gasoline. The mountain town of Juncos is one of the most affected after the pass of Hurricane María. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. JUNCOS, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 24

(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Naguabo Puerto Rico. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 22


(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

A man rides his bicycle through a damaged road in Toa Alta, west of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria.

(RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images)

People wait in line at a bank as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 25, 2017 in San Juan Puerto Rico. Maria left widespread damage across Puerto Rico, with virtually the whole island without power or cell service. SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 25

(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Marry Ann Aldea holds her mother Maria Dolores Hernandez medicines at her home. Hernandez suffers from many health conditions that will be aggravated by the lack of electricity and water. The mountain town of Juncos is one of the most affected after the pass of Hurricane María. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. JUNCOS, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 24

(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Two people sit in an apartment with a wall missing along the waterfront in San Juan. Nearly one week after hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, residents are still trying to get the basics of food, water, gas, and money from banks. Much of the damage done was to electrical wires, fallen trees, and flattened vegetation, in addition to home wooden roofs torn off. SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 25


(Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Sunday mass at San Juan Bautista Church at Valencia Arriba, Juncos. The mountain town of Juncos is one of the most affected after the pass of Hurricane María. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. JUNCOS, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 24


(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Crops flattened in the fields of Puerto Rico. Nearly one week after hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, residents are still trying to get the basics of food, water, gas, and money from banks. Much of the damage done was to electrical wires, fallen trees, and flattened vegetation, in addition to home wooden roofs torn off. SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 25

(Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

People try to get a signal before a celular communications tower on the expressway in Dorado, Puerto Rico, on September 22, 2017 in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello called Maria the most devastating storm in a century after it destroyed the US territory's electricity and telecommunications infrastructure.

(HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

Danalys Luna and Edgardo Feliciano wash their clothes in a stream as people wait for the electrical and water grids to be repaired September 24, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. AIBONITO, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 24

(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A school's bus at Naguabo Puerto Rico. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. PUERTO RICO SEPTEMBER 22

(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

An ambulance drives on a flooded street in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico on September 22, 2017. Puerto Rico battled dangerous floods Friday after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island, as rescuers raced against time to reach residents trapped in their homes and the death toll climbed to 33. Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello called Maria the most devastating storm in a century after it destroyed the US territory's electricity and telecommunications infrastructure.

(RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images)

A house sits precariously on an area affected by landslides in Corozal, southwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Rossello called Maria the most devastating storm in a century after it destroyed the US territory's electricity and telecommunications infrastructure.

(RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images)

Damaged warehouse at Carraizo Puerto Rico. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. PUERTO RICO SEPTEMBER 22

(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Genesis Lozada, 20, stands in front of her family home, which is still flooded, in water above her ankles as many wait for the return of normalcy. Residents of the beach town of Loiza, Puerto Rico, who received heavy flooding and wind damage, have no power, no running water, but are working to piece their lives back together as Puerto Rico tries to recover from the Category 4 storm on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)

Line outside a Supermarket in San Juan. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 22

(Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

A woman collects water from a natural spring created by the landslides in a mountain next to a road in Corozal, west of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria.

(RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images)

Puerto Rico's Governor Ricardo Rossello speaks to the media during a press conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Rossello called Maria the most devastating storm in a century after it destroyed the US territory's electricity and telecommunications infrastructure.

(RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Coast Guard Lt Ed Sella pilots the HC-130 Coast Guard plane as they prepare to land at the San Juan International Airport after Hurricane Maria passed through the area on September 22, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 22

(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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