Meditation Changes Your Brain for the Better, Even if You're Not a Monk

The best way to benefit from meditation is to start small — really small. Dr. Suzuki explains how short bursts of meditation can change the biology of your brain for the better, making you healthier and more purpose driven.

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You don't have to become a monk to learn from one, says Dr. Wendy Suzuki, professor of neural science and psychology at New York University. Research into how meditation affects the brain is conclusive: Meditating immediately changes the frequency of your brain waves and, after five years, increases the size of white matter bundles in the prefrontal cortex.

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Tim Hunt’s 'Women Scientists' Joke Shows He Doesn’t Understand Science, Either.

"In my opinion you’re allowed to cry." Neuroscientist Dr. Wendy Suzuki reacts to the controversial comments made this week by Nobel Laureate Sir Tim Hunt.

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Neuroscientist Dr. Wendy Suzuki took offense to recent comments by Nobel Laureate Tim Hunt about women scientists who become emotional and cry. Not only did she find Hunt's words to be inappropriate, but also Suzuki believes they represent an outdated culture that expects scientists to carry themselves without authentic emotion. Science is like any other beloved livelihood; it's built upon the passion of the men and women involved in it. There's no reason, says Suzuki, that emotion should be subdued. It's okay to cry when you're happy. It's okay to show your frustration when things go wrong. Suzuki's new book is titled Healthy Brain, Happy Life: A Personal Program to Activate Your Brain and Do Everything Better.