Here's What 19th-Century American Cartoonists Thought of Russia

Way before there was Cracked or Mad magazine, there was Puck, a weekly satirical publication that came out of St. Louis, Missouri in 1871. Here are some of the incredible full-color illustrations of that era's political issues. 

 

Disappointment / Keppler. 1898 (Image: Picryl)
Politics & Current Affairs

Way before there was Cracked or Mad magazine, there was Puck, a weekly political satire publication out of St. Louis, Missouri. The founder of Puck, Joseph Ferdinand Keppler, published it in English and German, and each issue included several full-color illustrations: on the cover, on the background and on a double-page centerfold. Puck’s images were full of pawky humor that illustrated the political aspects and world line-up before the First World War. By 1884, its success was notable, with a circulation of at least 125,000 copies.

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See Images By America's First War Photographer

Who was the father of American photojournalism? Here's a look at the Civil War work of Mathew Brady.

Confederate prisoners awaiting transportation, Belle Plain, Va, 1865. (Image: Picryl)
Culture & Religion

Despite the limits of early picture-taking technology, in the 1840s photography had become a popular art form and a profitable business.

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The 9 Circles of Hell in Images: Dante's "The Divine Comedy"

A spiritual journey through the world beyond the grave, a hell, a purgatory, and a paradise is considered a masterwork of world literature.

Detail of a miniature of Virgil reaching for Lucifer's legs and above, climbing out of the mouth of Hell with Dante. (British Library via Picryl)
Culture & Religion

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A Tribute in Art: 15 Years On, Explore the Library of Congress’ 9/11 Image Collection

Soon after the 9/11 attacks, the Library of Congress started to gather pictures, photographs, poems and other material for preservation. 

Tribute in Light.
Politics & Current Affairs

On September 11, 2001, the twin towers of the NYC World Trade Center, and the Pentagon building were attacked by suicide hijackers on three planes. A fourth plane, headed for either the Capitol Building or the White House in D.C., crashed near in Pennsylvania after the passengers fought the hijackers. These tragic events led to the death of almost 3,000 people and injuries for more than 6,000 others, and created a permanent hinge point in the world's history. The official responsibility for these attacks is to the al-Qaeda terrorist organization, of which former senior members have asserted responsibility.

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