The Power of Copycatting

You copy the people to whom you are connected primarily and you come to copy them along a whole variety of traits.  

One of the things that we have found in the study of networks is that whenever people are free to choose anything they want they usually choose what their friends have chosen and people tend to copy each other.  This sort of fundamental mimicry or this mimicry that we humans evince is extremely fundamental and therefore, networks provide us a kind of mathematical, social and biological tool to understand the kind of fundamental basis for this mimicry because you copy the people to whom you are connected primarily and you come to copy them along a whole variety of traits.  

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