Unhealthy gut bacteria tells you to eat when you're not hungry

What makes you want to eat even when you're not hungry? Scientists at UCLA now know exactly why.

Increased amounts of certain microbiomes could be causing you to binge-eat, or eat "hedonistically." That's the news from a recent UCLA study about how your gut's bacteria contributes to your overall health. It's no secret that a healthy diet can promote a faster, sharper brain, and it's also no secret that your brain views junk food and drugs similarly. What wasn't known is which particular metabolites were making all the difference. 

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Why memories can feel like movies

When Adele sings "It felt like a movie...", there's a scientific reason that it did. Your brain is technically unconscious about 240 times a minute.

You're reading this, but you're also not. About four times a second, your brain breaks focus to "check in" on your surroundings—and then refocuses back on the task at hand. According to a fascinating study just published in Neuron, you never really notice that you're "zooming out" about 240 times a minute for milliseconds at a time. 

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Here's what is going to be more expensive thanks to Trump's tariff war

Do you wear hats? Or own a lamp? Well, say goodbye (or perhaps more accurately: 再见) to them, as in late September there will be a 25% increase in prices thanks to President Trump's peculiar fixation on tariffs.

Do you wear hats? Or own a lamp? Well, say goodbye (or perhaps more accurately: 再见) to them, as in late September there will be a 25% increase in prices thanks to President Trump's peculiar fixation on tariffs. It's a move that even the U.S Chamber of Commerce says will "dramatically expand harm to American consumers, workers, businesses, and the economy."

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Junk food and drugs: your body doesn't know the difference

Substance dependence also applies to food addiction, says a University of Michigan study.

Junk food and drugs. Sounds like a typical Friday afternoon to me. But according to a 2015 study that is just recently making the rounds, researchers at the University of Michigan have found that your body doesn't really know the difference between the two. There's a scientific reason that "once you pop, you can't stop." 

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