The Brain Has 3 Systems for Mating — Combined, They Promote Adultery

Even though adultery is punishable by death in some societies, it still occurs regularly. This tells Dr. Helen Fisher there is probably a genetic predisposition toward cheating on your partner.

Even though adultery is punishable by death in some societies, it still occurs regularly. This tells Dr. Helen Fisher there is probably a genetic predisposition toward cheating on your partner. Of course not everyone cheats, so it's not necessary for survival, but if we dial back ten thousand years, to a time when resources were more scarce, adultery would have helped genes survive the present generation and be passed onto the next. That gives a clear rational for men's desire to cheat, but what about women? Fisher offers several explanations...

Here's a Neurochemical Profile of 3 Presidential Candidates — And Their Supporters

Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders: The biology of their brains is different from one another, which shows in their speech, behavior, and in who their supporters are.

There's a not-too-subtle similarity between the leading GOP candidate, Donald J. Trump, and the alpha male Russian president Vladimir Putin. Both are primarily ruled by testosterone, says biological anthropologist Helen Fisher. Meanwhile, America's estrogen candidate isn't who you might expect. Hillary Clinton is too warlike and direct to claim the title. She falls between the barbarism of Trump and the soft, grandfatherly Bernie Sanders. These differences in biology help determine a candidate's personality and therefore what kind of people they attract to their campaigns.

The Science behind Maintaining a Happy Long-Term Relationship

We all want to have a good, stable relationship with somebody, says Dr. Helen Fisher. So it's important to understand how intense romantic love affects our long-term goals.

Plenty of people are pessimistic about the state of relationships in society. Dr. Helen Fisher, senior research fellow at the Kinsey Institute, isn't one of them. She sees trends like extended periods of cohabitation before marriage and a persistent fear of divorce not only as interrelated, but also signs of a healthy change in attitude toward love. While marriage was once the start of a long-term relationship, she says, today is it's the finale. And that's a good way to cope with a brain whose primitive regions are driven intensely toward short-term relationships. Dr. Fisher also explains how to maintain novelty, the fuel of romantic love, and how to be aware of the brain regions that affect satisfaction in a relationship.