I Don't Want a Seat at the Table. I Want to Change the Table.

As we take seats at that table we have different perspectives.

I think that there’s a critical mass forming of more women who are in the executive ranks here and around the world and more women who are going onto boards.  Having said that, I would also say that because of mergers and acquisitions, the number of boards has shrunk, the number of women on boards is still insignificant compared to men, the percentages are still low. 

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How To View the Future Objectively

Once you have an opinion about what’s going to happen, you can no longer find things that are true, you only look for things that track your own opinion. 

When I think about what helped me find success, what intrinsic qualities I had to have to do what I do -- which is study the future -- I know that one of the most important things I can bring to that is objectivity.  Because once you have an opinion about what’s going to happen, you can no longer find things that are true, you only look for things that track your own opinion. 

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I have my own personal definition of disadvantage and it comes from my own background of growing up in foster homes in Brooklyn, New York.  I never felt that I was disadvantaged because I was poor.  My disadvantage as I grew up came from the fact that I didn’t know anybody who knew anybody, and from the fact that I had no role models.  Nobody showed me what my future could be.  I just knew that there were women who were teachers, women who were librarians, and women who were nurses.  And it was kind of like if you wanted a career you could be one of those three and that was it.  

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The Birth of the Metaspace Economy

As we head out into the future we know that we can predict certain kinds of disruptive technologies.

We were in the agricultural era for tens of thousands of years.  We were in the industrial for two hundred.  We were in the post-industrial for forty-five.  In 1992, we moved into yet another phase, which we called the emotile.  And we are now moving into another economy, which we call the metaspace economy.  The real story here is that each time these fundamental transformations took place they were resolved in disruptive technologies that, not by themselves but in combination with other disruptive technologies, combined to change the way work was getting done, to create efficiencies, throw people out of work, but then went on to create whole other businesses.  

So basically, the industrial age that was ushered in to create efficiencies in agriculture, through the steam engine bringing food to market, the machines that were the tractors, and so on.  They went on to become industries in clothes washers and dryers, and hair dryers.  That had nothing to do with efficiencies in agriculture, they just built whole other industries out of that.  And the same thing with the post-industrial era, disruptive technologies came along in telephony and computing, and created efficiencies and robotics and automation, and we didn’t need all of those people on the factory floor.  But whole other new businesses grew up around computing and telephony and so on.

The real key as we head into the future is that here’s an economy that lasted tens of thousands of years, then the disruptive technologies.  Here’s another one that lasted for less than two hundred years, then the disruptive technologies.  Here’s another one, the post-industrial, forty-five years, then disruptive technologies in 1992.  And then we knew that we had till 2005 before we saw the new disruptive technologies take place.  So in our business that was easily seeable to us; we weren’t surprised.  So are you always surprised by disruptive technologies?  No, but by a specific disruptive technology, possibly, but not the fact that they will happen and that they will combine to change the entire economy as we know it.

So as we head out into the future we know that we can predict certain kinds of disruptive technologies.  We know that, for example, brain imaging will be a major disruptive technology in terms of the advancements that will be made there and how that will affect everything from marketing to education to even criminal justice.  We know that the ability to harness nanotechnology—nano means billionths of—so in nanoseconds a billionth of a meter; a nanometer is a billionth—a nanosecond is a billionth of a second; a nanometer is a billionth of a meter.  Harnessing things that fast and that small will be totally disruptive.  

We have something coming along now, 3D Printing.  So imagine your laser jet printer being able to make, you know, any article that you might have to go to a store for; and then also, to be able to make food.  3D Printers are now actually printing food.  So that’s disruptive.  Then if you take a look at what we call something that eyes glaze over when we say this, but we call it BAANGFUEL—B-A-A-N-G-F-U-E-L.  And what that stands for is bits, atoms, antimatter, neurons, genes, frequencies and vibrations, and ultra and intraspectral energy, and light.  What that really is talking about is the fact that we’re going to be combining organic and inorganic materials. We’re going to be creating things from the molecular level on up.  

We’re going to be able to discover things in the light spectrum, frequencies and vibrations, that we have not harnessed before, and in combinations and in recombinations.  These disruptive technologies in and of themselves will create even more massive disruptions as they combine, and the numbers of combinations there will be infinite.  We know that we’re looking at disruptive technologies on so many fronts.  So it’s not always easy to know or to name any one, but we know that in all of these tracks the disruptive technologies will be there.

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