Angry with someone online? You should (literally) hear them out.

Want a genuine exchange of ideas? Science proves you won't get that in the comments section.

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Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • A 2016 Pew Research survey showed that half of political discussion online leaves participants feeling worse off then when they started.
  • Ideological opponents are less likely to be dehumanized when their voices are heard aloud vs. typing.
  • Morally outrageous content is more likely to be shared than rational political talking points.
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The science behind why our brains make us cooperate (or disagree)

Studies from neuroscience highlight how the brain both helps with and prevents collaboration.

Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Neuroscientists identify the parts of the brain that affect our social decision-making.
  • Guilt has a large affect on social interactions, find the researchers.
  • To find ways to cooperate, people need to let go of fear and anxiety, suggest studies
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Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • As a result of this increased tribalization of views, it's becoming increasingly more difficult to engage in polite conversation with people possessing opposing viewpoints.
  • 71% of Americans believe that political correctness had silenced important discussions necessary to our society.
  • We need to start teaching people how to approach subjects from less of an emotional or baseless educational bias or identity, especially in the event that the subject matter could be construed to be controversial or uncomfortable.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.
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Forced examination: How the free speech of others benefits us all

Americans say we value free speech, but recent surveys suggest we love the ideal more than practice, a division that will harm more than it protects.

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Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • A majority of Americans believe we should protect people from deleterious ideas and speech.
  • This belief may harm us, both as individuals and as a society, by ironically strengthening the very ideas that do us harm.
  • Forced examination provides a means by which we can strengthen our own ideas while weeding the harmful ones from society, but it only works with free expression for everyone.
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