Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • As a result of this increased tribalization of views, it's becoming increasingly more difficult to engage in polite conversation with people possessing opposing viewpoints.
  • 71% of Americans believe that political correctness had silenced important discussions necessary to our society.
  • We need to start teaching people how to approach subjects from less of an emotional or baseless educational bias or identity, especially in the event that the subject matter could be construed to be controversial or uncomfortable.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.
Keep reading Show less

Forced examination: How the free speech of others benefits us all

Americans say we value free speech, but recent surveys suggest we love the ideal more than practice, a division that will harm more than it protects.

Photo: Getty Images
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • A majority of Americans believe we should protect people from deleterious ideas and speech.
  • This belief may harm us, both as individuals and as a society, by ironically strengthening the very ideas that do us harm.
  • Forced examination provides a means by which we can strengthen our own ideas while weeding the harmful ones from society, but it only works with free expression for everyone.
Keep reading Show less

The Thucydides Trap: How to stop the looming war between China and the U.S.

The Thucydides Trap leads us to believe a U.S.-China war is inevitable. But is a 2,400-year-old school of thought really what the U.S. should base its foreign policy on?

Is war with China inevitable? The U.S. must stop basing its foreign policy on 2,400 year old schools of though.
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
Keep reading Show less

5 cognitive biases that explain America's biggest foreign policy mistakes

We think of ourselves as rational beings, but our cognitive biases often mean our decisions are based on instincts and emotions. Here are five times cognitive biases pushed Americans to advance foreign policies that stood against the country’s best interests.

Claire Tortorello, holding a photo of her son Greg, wipes a tear from her eye following the singing of a patriotic song during a war protest March 22, 2003 in downtown Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
Keep reading Show less