It’s Easy to Teach Kids to Love Science. So Why Do We Keep Failing at It?

Science needs to be about discovery, not rote memorization.

Surprising Science

Science needs to be about discovery, not rote memorization. Kids become turned off of science at an early age because the way we teach it makes such little sense. "Science is your ticket to understanding the world and the universe and then it’s with you for life," explains theoretical physicist Brian Greene. "If you can have that experience, it changes everything."

Science and Art Are Not Separate Disciplines

Artists and scientists alike strive "to figure out the deep truths of reality," explains physicist Brian Greene. The ways they pursue that goal are different, but there's no reason why two segments of society seeking answers can't work together.

Surprising Science

Artists and scientists alike strive "to figure out the deep truths of reality," explains physicist Brian Greene. The ways they pursue that goal are different, but there's no reason why two segments of society seeking answers can't work together. That's why Greene advocates for the convergence of art and science. When the two camps share insights and ideas about the world, the results can be wonderfully potent.

Here's What Brian Greene's Gut Is Telling Him About Intelligent Life in the Universe

Is there intelligent life out there in the universe? Theoretical physicist Brian Greene explains why that's a more complicated question that it appears.

Surprising Science

Is there intelligent life out there in the universe? That question is more complicated than you might imagine. What constitutes intelligent life? How does it come to be? How many totally random happenstances occurred just so we could exist, and could those happenstances occur again elsewhere out there? Why, as Fermi so astutely asked, haven't intelligent beings communicated with us yet? Theoretical physicist Brian Greene, a Columbia University professor and chairman of the World Science Festival, shoots from the hip and says, "Yeah, I think there’s probably alien life out there. Probably intelligent life too."

If Your Computer Existed in Multiple Universes, It Would Be Way Faster

Theoretical physicist Brian Greene gives a crash course on quantum computing in two minutes.

Surprising Science

Theoretical physicist Brian Greene gives a two-minute crash course on quantum computing, which is pretty amazing considering how elaborate such a computer would be. The tl;dr version is pretty much this: If we posit that there are multiple universes in which various probable situations play themselves out, a quantum computer would be able to run calculations within all these different universes at once. Greene, who is chairman of the World Science Festival, explains that the implications of such a machine would be tremendous.