Why humanitarian aid is a powerful foreign policy strategy

Humanitarian aid increases human welfare on a global scale, but it can also be one of the greatest ways of spreading influence and diplomatic power.

U.S. Air Force planes delivered USAID humanitarian supplies in Tunisia, on March 4, 2011, less than 24 hours after President Obama directed the U.S. military to support international humanitarian efforts in response to the crisis in Libya. (Photo: US AFRI
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How the Marshall Plan helped avoid World War 3

As victor of WWII, America set out with its allies to rebuild the broken world through its greatest diplomatic effort in history: The Marshall Plan.

Left: George C. Marshall, General of the Army before becoming U.S. Secretary of State. Right: Map of Cold-War era Europe showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. Red columns show the relative amount of total aid per nation. (Wikimedia Commons)
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Do trade wars really put America first?

President Trump has placed retaliatory tariffs on the U.S.’s closest allies. His justification for this policy is national security and the protection of America’s businesses. But history has shown us that trade wars don’t put America first.

History has shown us that trade wars don’t put America first. (Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images/Shutterstock)
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