Some Thoughts on the National Intelligence Council’s New Report

The past decade has seen much commentary about the perils of triumphalism—with good reason.  That sentiment contributed not only to America’s decisions to invade Iraq and undertake a nation-building effort in Afghanistan, but also to the “irrational exuberance” of lenders and consumers that burst the housing bubble in 2007.  It’s appropriate, then, to adopt a more realistic conception of U.S. power and influence:

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What Does 2013 Have in Store?

I mentioned in my last post that I had attended the Economist’s “The World in 2013” festival. Here are some zingers (paraphrased) that got my attention:

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The National Intelligence Council’s New Report

I recently attended the second day of the Economist’s “The World in 2013” festival, and will be writing a post soon with some of my takeaways.  Today, however, I want to share some nuggets from the National Intelligence Council’s (NIC’s) new, highly anticipated report, Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds.  I hasten to note that I’m doing so after only a cursory review; the core of the report runs to over 130 pages, so I’ll be reviewing it more carefully in the coming days.   

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Central Challenges of U.S. Foreign Policy: Five Questions with Graham Allison

Ali Wyne interviews Graham Allison, the author of Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis, a book that swiftly and significantly altered our understanding of how policy decisions are executed. 

A year before becoming a full professor at Harvard University, 31-year-old Graham Allison published Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis (New York: Little, Brown, 1971), a book that swiftly and significantly altered our understanding of how policy decisions are executed.  Today, he’s widely known for sounding the alarm about the threat of nuclear terrorism: after the Soviet Union’s implosion, in fact, he earned the nickname “Mr. Loose Nukes” for warning that the vast stockpiles of nuclear weapons and materials on Russian soil could end up in terrorist hands.

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